From the Pod Farm: Ceratosaurus?

A few weeks ago, Burpee Museum Lab Staff and Volunteers opened another “pod” from the Hanksville-Burpee Dinosaur Quarry in Utah. This pod was removed from the site several years ago, and has been known as the Ceratosaurus Pod. Early on in the excavation at HBDQ a section of articulated vertebrae was discovered and, based on the visible portions of the vertebrae, the field identification of Ceratosaurus was given.

Ceratosaurus was not an unreasonable identification for theropod-looking vertebrae in the HBD Quarry. Ceratosaurus is known from quarries similar to HBDQ in both Utah and Colorado, including the Cleveland Lloyd Quarry and the Fruita Paleontological Area. (A special shout-out to colleagues and collaborators attending the Mid-Mesozoic Field Conference who just visited both Cleveland Lloyd and FPA this week!)

However, now that the pod is open and the matrix is being worked away the characteristics that fueled the field identification are also being worked away. Such is the case with more field identifications than not, as prep work progresses the identification must be reviewed and refined. So, for now, check out the pictures of the “Ceratosaurus” and stay tuned for more updates as the Burpee Lab Staff reviews and refines their identification of this specimen. (Or, if you like, leave us a comment with your proposed identification!)

The pod, the whole pod, and nothing but the pod

The pod, the whole pod, and nothing but the pod

 

A closer view of the right side of the image where most of the prep has occurred.

A closer view of the right side of the image where most of the prep has occurred.

Detail of the most prepped area.

Detail of the most prepped area.

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2 thoughts on “From the Pod Farm: Ceratosaurus?

  1. Pingback: Help Identify a New Fossil at the Burpee Museum of Natural History - Dinosaur.Today

  2. I’m not sure what it is-but I saw a large boulder hiking In Capitol Reef last year that looked very similar. It had points sticking right out ot the rock in a line formation. I did contact Dr. Kirkland from the USGS- but never heard back. He’s busy with the Utahraptors over in Moab. I could text pics of it.

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